Binding

Our Thirteenth Divorce

Matthew Deshe Cashion

 

Synopsis:

Chaos will surely ensue when Judith Owen allows her first husband, a jobless jokester of a salesman, to move into her coastal Georgia backyard “condo” thirty years after she divorced him. Married six times each, they argue over what advice to give their only child, Harold, 32, who is approaching his first marriage. Then Judith’s next-door parents (married miserably for fifty years) host a Christmas party packed with a cast of eccentric characters (including seven ex-in-laws), four yard dogs, eight wild children, and Harold’s fiancée, a New York City-raised therapist and her Chihuahua . . .

 

 

 

ISBN: 978-160489-184-3 Hard cover $24.95 Sale Price $9.95

ISBN: 978-160489-185-0  Trade paper $15.95 Sale Price $14.95

204 Pages

  About the Author: 

Matthew Cashion was born in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, and grew up in Brunswick, Ga.  He earned a master of fine arts degree from the University of Oregon. His first novel, How the Sun Shines on Noise was published by Livingston Press and was a finalist, among 400 manuscripts, in the 2003 William Faulkner Creative Writing Competition co-sponsored by The Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society and The Mary Freeman Wisdom Foundation based in New Orleans, La. His story collection, Last Words of the Holy Ghost, won the Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction in 2015. He has worked (in this order): on a tobacco farm, as a short-order cook, in fast-food, at a video store, in an airport tollbooth, as a door-to-door environmental fundraiser, at a chemical plant (now an EPA superfund site), in construction, as an AM disc jockey, as a waiter, as a third-shift convenience store clerk, as a blood donor (part-time), and as a bartender.  He has also been an AP award-winning journalist, and he has taught literature and fiction writing at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte and Mitchell Community College, in Statesville, North Carolina. He now teaches at The University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, where he is the faculty advisor for Steam Ticket, a student-run literary journal

 

 

 

   

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